The Pixel Project Selection 2016: 16 Notable Facebook Pages by Anti-Violence Against Women Organisations

Foto-Facebook

Since being founded in 2004, Facebook has become a social media powerhouse, with over 1.64 billion monthly active users as of March 2016, 84.2% of which are outside of North America. Facebook has grown from a basic social connection website to a life platform. It is used to find, connect, and catch up with friends, to read the news, to conduct business, to shop, and to learn.

Facebook is also used to find causes, organisations, and events that are important to us and to advocate for various issues. Now Facebook users can learn about and support global issues from their own homes. Violence against women (VAW) is one of the global human rights issues finding supporters on Facebook. Now a story about VAW can be read, watched, or heard via Facebook by millions of people around the globe. They can follow organisational news, participate in grassroots campaigns, and donate right from their mobile phone or computer.

This is our fifth annual list of recommended Facebook pages and we have selected them because they make an effort to temper humour with information, offer a significant way for their readers to help, and make those in the fight feel more powerful and part of something greater. They present a unique perspective on a global issue. So choose a couple to ‘like’, or better yet ‘like’ them all, get informed, and take action.

Written and compiled by Rebecca DeLuca

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Recommended Facebook Page #1: All Women’s Action Society – Malaysia

all-womengcos-action-society

All Women’s Action Society Malaysia is part of a larger organisation that works towards securing women’s rights, building gender equality, supporting women in crisis, and empowering women. The AWAM Malaysia Facebook Page offers local and international news in a variety of media forms, including photos, graphics, text and podcasts.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #2: Chayn Pakistan – Pakistan

chayn-pakistanChayn Pakistan is an affiliate of Chayn.org, a global volunteer-led crowdsourced website that informs and supports women facing domestic violence. The organisation provides followers information on recognising abuse, understanding its impacts on one’s health, getting help and more. Through Chayn Pakistan, women can share their thoughts and feelings publicly or anonymously and receive well wishes from others.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #3: Daughters Rising – Thailand

daughtersrisingDaughter’s Rising’s mission is to empower at-risk girls through education to end trafficking and exploitation in their communities. As Daughter’s Rising focuses on sex trafficking and exploitation, their Facebook Page is a resource for similar activists, sharing unique, global news and personal stories. Fans are also introduced to the women and girls Daughter’s Rising empowers through their many programs.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #4: Dr. Denis Mukwege – Democratic Republic of Congo

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Dr. Denis Mukwege, founder and medical director of the Panzi Foundation, is an advocate for women in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Dr. Mukwege believes in a holistic model of caring for survivors of sexual violence, including mental, emotional, social and physical care. He maintains a bi-lingual Facebook page where he shares updates on his programmes, speaking engagements and work in both French and English.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #5: Our Watch – Australia

our-watchOur Watch Australia works to end violence against women and their children. Beyond research, education, and producing a library of training resources, Our Watch Australia maintains a variety of programs, including The Line, a behaviour change campaign for young people aged 12-20, Sport Engagement Program and educating hospitals on responses to family violence.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #6: Sisters in Islam –  Malaysia

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Sisters in Islam promotes the rights of women within the framework of Islam and the principles of equality, justice and freedom. The organisation offers a library of legal and informative resources on various topics, including polygamy, child marriage, violence against women, Muslim Family Law and more. Sisters in Islam leaders Marina Mahathir and Zainah Anwar also have active columns in The Star, a leading national English-language daily, ensuring important issues remain at in the news.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #7: Singapore Committee for UN Women -Singapore

singapore-committee-for-un-women

The Singapore Committee for UN Women works toward gender equality in Singapore by supporting programs that provide women and girls access to education, healthcare, independence and a safety. The organisation’s Facebook page is a hub for the program updates and events that supporters can attend. Fans of the Singapore Committee for UN Women can share ideas and information in a safe and monitored environment.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #8: Sister-Hood – Worldwide

sister-hood

Founded by Fuse CEO Deeyah Khan, sister-hood is a digital magazine featuring the voices of women of Muslim heritage. The goal of sister-hood is to promote and unite the feminists from Muslim heritage, and connect a global community of women. The sister-hood contributors produce various pieces of digital content, including news, opinion pieces, interviews, reviews, video, poetry and photography.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #9: St. Mary’s Centre – United States

st-marys-centerSt. Mary’s Center for Women and Children provides programs for women and children who have experienced trauma and are living in poverty. These programs include education, shelter, technical skills development and more. Fans of the St. Mary’s Center Facebook Page will not only receive updates on programmes, but will also learn about the many events they can attend, such as Diamonds of Dorchester or Dancing for Hope.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #10: The Fawcett Society – United Kingdom

the-fawcett-societyThe Fawcett Society is a leading charity campaigning for gender equality and women’s rights in the UK. Fans of the Fawcett Society’s Facebook page will find local events they can attend and support, news, and updates on the organisation’s campaigns, including Equal Pay Day, Views not Shoes and Don’t Blame it on the Girls.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #11: The Garden of Hope Foundation – Asia

the-garden-of-hope-foundation

The Garden of Hope (GOH) runs women’s shelters, call centres, counselling programs and advocacy campaigns to relieve and rehabilitate abuse victims and promote gender equality. The GOH has recently expanded their programing to include services that will empower women and girls to become economically independent. Fans of the GOH Facebook Page will be introduced to various GOH programs and advocacy campaigns, and can follow the GOH’s speaking engagements and event participation.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #12: Unchained At Last – United States

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Unchained At Last helps women and girls leave and avoid arranged or forced marriages by providing free legal and social services, as well as emotional support. The organisation also provides education for domestic violence (DV) agencies, law enforcement, lawyers, and members of the judicial system. During Unchained At Last’s first five years, the organisation has helped more than 200 women and girls.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #13: WEvolve Global – Worldwide

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WEvolve Global empowers young men and women to challenge and break through social norms that lead to gender-based violence. The WEvolve Facebook Page shares a mixture of bite-sized facts and figures for advocates, videos and news stories about the issue of gender-based violence. Fans will also receive information on Blue Runway, WEvolve’s cornerstone programme, a place where actors, athletes, musicians and key cultural figures unite to celebrate the promise of change.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #14: Women LEAD – Nepal

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Women Lead provides support, skills and opportunities for young women in Nepal to become leaders in their communities, in the nation and around the world. Fans of the Women LEAD Facebook page are introduced to the young women and girls impacted by the organisation. They see their photos, learn about their history and learn how Women LEAD has impacted their lives.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #15: Women Peacemakers Programme – The Netherlands

womens-peacemaker-program

Women Peacemakers Program supports and empowers women peace activists, believing that peace can only be achieved when women are equal partners in the decision-making process. Based in the Netherlands, the Women Peacemakers Program’s Facebook Page shares news and updates the organisation, but from international women’s rights groups as well, making it a global resource.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #16: Women’s Legal Centre – South Africa

womengcos-legal-centre

Women’s Legal Centre (WLC) is an independent law centre established to advance women’s rights in South Africa. The WLC’s Facebook page shares legal news and updates on issues such as violence against women, women’s health, relationship rights, labour laws, property and housing, and sex worker rights. For more detailed information, fans may visit the WLC webpage and find a library of resources on the issues.

The Pixel Project Selection 2015: 16 Notable Facebook Pages by Anti-Violence Against Women Organisations

Foto-FacebookIn the last 11 years, Facebook has become a social media powerhouse, with over 1.44 billion monthly active users as of March 2015. Facebook has grown from a basic social connection website to a life platform. It is used to find, connect, and catch up with friends, to read the news, to conduct business, to shop, and to learn.

Facebook is also used to find causes, organisations, and events that are important to us and to advocate for various issues. Now Facebook users can learn about and support global issues from their own homes. Violence against women (VAW) is one of the global human rights issues finding supporters on Facebook. Now a story about VAW can be read, watched, or heard via Facebook by millions of people around the globe. They can follow organisational news, participate in grassroots campaigns, and donate right from their mobile phone or computer.

This is our fourth annual list of recommended Facebook pages and we have selected them because they make an effort to temper humour with information, offer a significant way for their readers to help, and make those in the fight feel more powerful and part of something greater. They present a unique perspective on a global issue.

In this article, we highlight 16 Facebook pages fighting violence against women that are unique in their messages and their delivery. So choose a couple to ‘like’, or better yet ‘like’ them all, get informed, and take action.

Written and compiled by Rebecca DeLuca

Call To Action: Help us reach the $25,000 fundraising milestone for our Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign this holiday season by giving generously to our “16 For 16” fundraiser (which also includes #GivingTuesday)! Find out more and donate to get awesome book and music goodies at http://is.gd/16DaysGT2015 


Recommended Facebook Page #1: Battered Women’s Justice Project – United Kingdom

Battered Womens Justice ProjectThe Battered Women’s Justice Project (BWJP) has been a national UK resource on the criminal and civil justice systems’ responses to domestic violence since 1994. The organisation provides technical assistance to victims of domestic violence, civil justice practitioners, and to the general public to promote systemic change. The BWJP’s Facebook page includes news, opinion pieces, and is also an information resource for other anti-VAW activists.

Recommended Facebook Page #2: Break the Cycle – United States

Break The CycleBreak the Cycle was founded in 1996 and provides preventative dating and domestic violence education for teens and young adults. By ‘liking’ the organisations’ Facebook page, fans will stay up-to-date on laws and bills passed to support the cause and statistics and research for activists. Though an American organisation, Break the Cycle also shares workshops and educational information to create global leaders in dating abuse prevention.

Recommended Facebook Page #3: Canadian Women’s Foundation – Canada

Canadian Womens FoundationThe Canadian Women’s Foundation’s mission is to empower women and girls to move out of poverty, out of violence and into confidence. Founded in 1991, the Foundation addresses the root causes of inequality to help women create safer families and communities. Now in its 24th year, the Foundation has invested in over 1,300 community programs in the world. Updates from these organisations, including photos, videos, and events, are all visible on the organisation’s Facebook page.

Recommended Facebook Page #4: Domestic Abuse Intervention Program (DAIP) – United States

DAIP LogoThe Domestic Abuse Intervention Program (DAIP) fights to end violence against women. Founded in 1980, the organisation offers domestic violence training and resources based on The Duluth Model, which continues to evolve and innovate around working together as a community to end domestic violence.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #5: Engender – Scotland

Engender LogoEngender has been working towards creating a safer Scotland for more than 20 years. The organisation aims to increase women’s power and influence and demonstrate the impact sexism has on women and on Scotland. When ‘liking’ Engender on Facebook, fans will be exposed to local events and workshops, updates on various partnerships including “Write to End Violence Against Women Awards”, and statistics to use in their own activism projects.

Recommended Facebook Page #6: FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture – United States

FORCEFORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture was founded by creative educators, organisers and activists Hannah Brancato and Rebecca Nagle. The group utilises imaginative tactics to have honest, public conversations about sexual violence. Some of their more well-known tactics include projecting “Rape is Rape” onto the US Capitol Building and releasing a parody Playboy anti-rape party guide. The FORCE Facebook page is a starting point for sexual assault activists, as they partner with major campaigns including The Monument Quilt. Though located in the United States, they share virtual events for Facebook fans worldwide.

Recommended Facebook Page #7: Futures without Violence – United States

Futures Without ViolenceFounded in 1980, Futures without Violence works to end domestic and dating violence, child abuse, sexual assault and more. They were monumental in developing the Violence Against Women Act passed by the US Congress, and continue to advocate for the safety of women and girls. Beyond activism, Futures without Violence trains professionals to improve responses to violence and abuse.

Recommended Facebook Page #8: Gender Based Violence (GBV) Prevention Network – Africa

GBV LogoThe Gender Based Violence (GBV) Prevention Network is a network of activists and organisations working together to stop violence against women. With over 500 members in 18 different countries, the GBV Prevention Network represents the Horn and East and Southern Africa. The Network’s Facebook Page welcomes discussion and promotes advancement, innovation, and sharing expertise.

Recommended Facebook Page #9: Guttmacher Institute – International

Guttmacher LogoThe Guttmacher Institute uses research, policy analysis and public education to advance women’s reproductive rights and sexual health worldwide. For over 50 years, the Institute has used their work to advance discussion, policy, and program development. Activists may use the organisation’s Facebook page as a resource for statistics, laws, and more when developing their own programs.

Recommended Facebook Page #10: Ilitha Labantu – Africa

Ilitha LabantuIlitha Labantu is active in women’s issues, focusing on the genocide in Rwanda, female mutilations in Ivory Coast, refugee women of South Sudan, and more. The organisation’s vision is to eliminate all kinds of domestic violence, especially those that occur in domains where the ideology of privacy is strong. Founded in 1989, Ilitha Labantu’s walk in centre provides vast services free of charge, including counselling, support groups, domestic violence shelter, legal services, and more.

Recommended Facebook Page #11: Jewish Women International – Worldwide

JWI LogoJewish Women International’s mission is to break the cycle of violence against women and girls. The organisation fights to ensure all women and girls thrive in healthy relationships, control their finances, and grow as leaders. JWI develops programming to protect constituents, provide resources and training to other organisations, and work at the grassroots levels to lobby for bill changes. When ‘liking’ JWI on Facebook, fans will be able to follow events and conferences through photos and updates, read opinion pieces, and see news updates.

Recommended Facebook Page #12: Men Against Rape and Discrimination (MARD) – India

MARD LogoMen against Rape and Discrimination (MARD) is a social initiative creating awareness about gender equality and respect towards women. Launched by Bollywood actor and director Farhan Akhtar, MARD uses music to convey their messages and inspires listeners to create a better society. The MARD Facebook page shares news, campaign updates, music, and videos with their fans as a way to support and encourage its mission.

Recommended Facebook Page #13: Mending the Sacred Hoop – United States

Mending the Sacred HoopMending the Sacred Hoop is an organisation focused on restoring the leadership of Native women. Through the Technical Assistance Project, they provide training to support community efforts to end violence against women. Their Facebook page shares information about various campaigns activists can get involved in, both local and global.

 

Recommended Facebook Page #14: Promundo – Brazil

Promundo LogoPromundo has been engaging men and boys to promote gender equality and to end violence against women since 1997. Founded in Brazil, the organisation promotes non-violence masculinities and gender relations. Connecting with activists in Brazil, the United States, and Rwanda, Promundo uses various campaigns, including the International Men and Gender Equality Survey, conflict and security, economic justice, and more.

Recommended Facebook Page #15: YWCA – United States

YWCA LogoYWCA is dedicated to empowering women and promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all. Though founded and located in the United States, YWCA serves more than 25 million women and girls in 125 different countries. The organisation shares legal information and legal updates on their Facebook page, which is useful for other activists to use in their programming. Also, the YWCA holds a yearly conference and gala, and shares live updates for those who cannot attend.

Recommended Facebook Page #16: Zonta International – Worldwide

Zonta International LogoZonta International is a global organisation empowering women through service and advocacy. Founded in 1919, members, also known as ‘Zontians,’ volunteer their time, talents, and support all over the world. Zonta envisions a world in which women’s rights are recognised as human rights and a world where no woman lives in fear of violence. They focus on improving the legal, political, economic, educational, health and professional status of women, prompting justice and universal respect, and more. On the organisation’s Facebook Page, fans will find news about international events Zontians are participating in, webcasts, conferences and workshops fans can attend remotely.

The Pixel Project Selection 2014 – 16 Notable Facebook Pages by Anti-Violence Against Women Organisations

Foto-FacebookIn only ten years, Facebook became a social media powerhouse, with 829 million daily active users as of June 2014. Of those users, 654 million log in from their mobile devices every day. Facebook has grown from a basic social connection website to a life platform. It is used to find, connect, and catch up with friends, to read the news, to conduct business, to shop, and to learn.

Facebook is also used to find causes, organisations, and events that are important to us and to advocate for various issues. Now, Facebook users can learn about and support global issues from their own home. They can follow organisational news, participate in grassroots campaigns, and donate right from their mobile phone or computer.

Violence against women is one of the global issues finding supporters on Facebook. Now, one story can be heard by millions of people around the globe. In this article, we highlight 16 anti-violence against women Facebook pages that are unique in their message and their delivery. This is our third annual list of recommended Facebook pages and we have selected them because they make an effort to temper humour with information, offer a significant way for their readers to help, and make those in the fight feel more powerful and part of something greater. They present a unique perspective on a global issue. So pick and choose a couple to ‘like’, or better yet – ‘like’ them all and get informed and take action.

Written and compiled by Rebecca DeLuca


Recommended Facebook Page 1: A Call to MenUnited States of America

A Call to MenA Call to Men is a violence prevention organisation geared towards men. The organisation educates men to be loving and respectful, so all women and girls can be valued and safe. A Call to Men believes shifting social norms about manhood is an integral step to ending domestic and sexual violence. Understanding that preventing violence against women is primarily the responsibility of men, A Call to Men utilises training, keynote presentations, consultation and education to challenge men’s understanding of masculinity. The Facebook page, while focused on United States media, shares global news about men’s roles in ending violence against women.

Recommended Facebook Page 2: Create Consent Culture by Providing Youth the ToolsCanada

Create Consent Culture by Providing Youth the ToolsCreate Consent Culture by Providing Youth the Tools is a Facebook community geared toward educators. The community’s goal is to develop resources to integrate consent-based education into schools. This Facebook page is a place for discussion about rape culture, a resource exchange, and an idea hub for educators. While many of the posts discuss education and educational institutions, followers will also find information for parents and news about other feminist organisations.

Recommended Facebook Page 3: Foundation to Prevent Violence against Women and their ChildrenAustralia

Foundation to Prevent Violence against Women and their ChildrenThe Foundation to Prevent Violence Against Women and their Children is an Australian organisation working to raise awareness about violence against women. The Foundation shares articles about empowering women, violence against women, and tips to end abuse. The Foundation’s Facebook page is also a resource for members to find information about upcoming women-focused events in various Australian communities.

Recommended Facebook Page 4: Girls Not BridesGlobal

Girls Not BridesGirls Not Brides, an organisation also featured in our 2013 edition of “16 Notable Activists and Nonprofits to Follow on Twitter,” is bringing global attention to the issue of child marriage. The Girls Not Brides Facebook page is a collaborative resource for discussions about ending child marriage and bringing awareness to child brides. While important news articles are shared, the Facebook page’s most important resource is real, first-hand stories from women and girls affected by child marriage. 

Recommended Facebook Page 5: Human Rights Project for GirlsUnited States of America

Human Rights Project for GirlsHuman Rights Project for Girls (Rights4Girls) is an organisation that focuses on gender-based violence and its effects on women and girls in the United States of America. Focusing on sexual violence, domestic violence, rape, and trafficking in the U.S., the organisation uses education and engagement to demand policy changes. The Rights4Girls Facebook page shares information on laws and policies affecting women and girls across the United States.

Recommended Facebook Page 6: Men Against ViolenceMauritius

Men Against ViolenceMen Against Violence (MAV) is a Mauritius nonprofit organisation framing violence against women as an issue men need to solve. The MAV Facebook page develops messages targeting men and boys and shares them in English and French. Not only does the organisation upload relevant news articles to its Facebook page, but it also shares videos, photos, and other forms of multimedia discussing violence against women.

Recommended Facebook Page 7: Object! Women not Sex ObjectsUnited Kingdom

Object Women not Sex ObjectsObject! Women not Sex Objects challenges the sexual objectification of women in the media and in popular culture. Object! uses grassroots activation and political lobbying to achieve its vision: a society free of sexism, in which women’s diversity is fully embraced and represented. While Object! focuses on ending sexual objectification, their Facebook page also acts as a hub for research and articles about a broader range of women’s rights issues. 

Recommended Facebook Page 8: Pandora’s ProjectAustralia and United States of America

Pandoras ProjectPandora’s Project is a haven for rape and sexual abuse survivors, and their family and friends. With an active community, the Facebook page acts as an online support group where survivors can tell their stories and connect with others. Pandora’s Project shares inspirational quotes, powerful messages, and articles about survival and coping.

Recommended Facebook Page 9: Sexual Violence Research InitiativeGlobal

Sexual Violence Research InitiativeThe Sexual Violence Research Initiative promotes research and generates empirical data about sexual violence. The organisation connects researchers, policy makers, donors and activists from around the world to ensure that sexual violence is recognised as a global issue. Those looking to study the effects of sexual violence, incorporate best practises into their teaching or therapy, or follow important research will find weekly SVRI updates including new research, grants, proposals and relevant news stories on the organisations’s Facebook page.

Recommended Facebook Page 10: Stop the Worldwide War on GirlsGlobal

Stop the Worldwide War on GirlsStop the Worldwide War on Girls is an active Facebook community building awareness about the frequent injustices women and girls face. If you are looking for global violence against women stories and updates, Stop the Worldwide War on Girls is a suggested place to begin. The Facebook page also has an active community, allowing you to engage in discussions, tell and read personal stories, and connect with like-minded activists.

Recommended Facebook Page 11: Take Back the TechGlobal

Take Back the TechTake Back the Tech! is a campaign calling for the control of technology to end violence against women. The campaign accompanies the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence in its daily actions, however the Facebook page is active the rest of the year too. Focusing on how technology and violence against women are connected, Take Back the Tech! engages its supporters in surveys, provides an anonymous harassment reporting service, and shares articles focusing on technology’s role in ending violence against women.

Recommended Facebook Page 12: The Girl Code Movement United States of America

The Girl Code MovementThe Girl Code Movement, founded by youth in New York, unites college women from across the United States to become activists in ending rape. The college-focused organisation uses education and training to empower women to become active bystanders. The organisation’s Facebook page includes stories from rape survivors, female empowerment quotes, news, and Cock Block Tips, which are tips to help women end rape.

Recommended Facebook Page 13: The Official 16 Days of Activation Against Gender Violence CampaignGlobal

The Official 16 DaysThe 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence is an international campaign aiming to end all forms of violence against women. Individuals and groups use the 16 days between November 25 (International Day Against Violence Against Women) and December 10 (International Human Rights Day) to illustrate that violence against women is a human rights violation. The Official 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence’s Facebook page is a focal point for the campaign, sharing actions and news and stories from the numerous individuals and groups involved. The rest of the year the Facebook page is a resource for those interested in the fight to end violence against women, sharing international news and important actions.

Recommended Facebook Page 14: The WAVE NetworkEurope

The WAVE NetworkWomen Against Violence Europe (WAVE) is a network of European NGOs promoting the human rights of women and children. Through raising awareness, empowering women and children, and lobbying, WAVE’s mission is to end violence against women. The WAVE Network uses its Facebook page to share articles about violence European women face. Also, the WAVE Network shares its lobbying efforts, event updates, and photos of their meetings, conferences, and events.

Recommended Facebook Page 15: V-DayGlobal

vdayV-Day, a global moment to end violence against women and girls, promotes creative events that increase awareness and raise money for anti-violence organisations. One of V-Day’s signature campaigns, One Billion Rising, brings together a billion people from across the globe to rise, dance, release and demand justice to end violence against women and girls. The V-Day Facebook page shares information about global anti-violence movements and events, making it easy for supporters to get involved.

Recommended Facebook Page 16: Women Against AbuseUnited States of America

Women against abuseIn 1976, a time when services for victims of domestic violence were unheard of, two social workers started Philadelphia’s first domestic violence hotline. Now, Women Against Abuse is one of the largest domestic violence agencies in the country. Though the non-profit organisation is located in Philadelphia, they share statistics, research, and articles that are pertinent to victims and survivors across the United States.

16 Ways The Men Can Help Stop Online Violence Against Women

Social Media Logotype BackgroundWith the rise of social media and smartphones in the last decade or so, Facebooking, tweeting, pinning, blogging, and vlogging have become a default part of many people’s professional, personal and social lives. Communities are no longer limited to face-to-face interactions, but also flourish online in the form of Facebook pages, Twitter followers, YouTube subscribers and blogger networks.

Through these online communities, the Internet has become a conduit for the free-flow of ideas, opinions, thoughts, beliefs and values. As online communities become more ubiquitous and entrenched in our lives, the boundaries have long-ago blurred between our offline behaviour and online conduct and in many cases, the Internet acts to amplify anti-social, criminal and bigoted behaviour because of the anonymity it gives to participants and commentators who frequently engage in hurtful behaviour with impunity.

In the case of Violence Against Women (VAW), the Internet and social media has given misogyny an incredibly visible platform with almost no controls in place to check their behaviour towards women and girls online. As Laura Bates, the founder of The Everyday Sexism Project, says:

The internet is a fertile breeding ground for misogyny – you only have to look at the murky bottom waters of Reddit and 4Chan to see the true extent to which it allows violent attitudes towards women to proliferate. But, crucially, it also provides a conduit that enables many who hold those views to attack and abuse women and girls, from what they rightly perceive to be an incredibly secure position.

Indeed, from Anita Sarkeesian to the Steubenville rape case, cyber VAW has been on the rise over the past decade, with the most recent high-profile case being the horrendous Twitter attacks on feminist campaigner Caroline Criado-Perez after her success in getting the Bank of England to include a woman on a UK currency note.

Anti-VAW activists and nonprofits and online women’s rights communities are now fighting back with campaigns aimed at getting social media networks, governments and law enforcement agencies to take cyber VAW seriously and to take action to prevent and stop it. As with all aspects of stopping VAW, support of men and boys is crucial to this fight and in this “16 for 16” article, we present 16 ways in which men can help stop cyber VAW

Introduction by Regina Yau; Written by Rashad Brathwaite and Regina Yau; Edited by Jerica Nonell and Regina Yau.

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Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #1: Acknowledge the violence. There are 3 important ways in which men need to effectively acknowledge cyber violence against women. The first step is to be aware of and accept the fact that it definitely exists. The second step is to acknowledge that in the rough-and-tumble on online interaction, women and girls face a different, more extreme, and more insidious kind of backlash than men including a disproportionate number of threats of physical violence, name-calling, reputation assasination, death threats, sexual assault threats and rape threats. The third step is to publicly recognise cyber VAW when it happens and to intervene.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #2: Educate yourself. The first step towards effective online bystander intervention is developing the ability to recognise the signs and manifestations of cyber VAW within online communities. These run the gamut from rape joke Facebook pages to mass misogynistic trolling in the comments section of opinion pieces written by women. Check out online resources that provide information online online bullying and cyber VAW, including What Men Can Do. Knowing what cyber VAW looks like will enable you to take timely action to intervene to stop the violence.

tnc_logoMen Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #3: Educate the next generation. One of the most effective ways of helping stop cyber VAW is to educate the next generation of boys and youth about the issue and to equip them to deal with it. For example: That’s Not Cool is a public education campaign that raises awareness about teen dating violence by sharing examples of unhealthy, controlling, and abusive behavior. The campaign teaches youth risk factors for “textual harassment,” “pic pressure,” and other signs of unhealthy relationship behavior. “That’s Not Cool” also provides resources and information on ways to intervene if a young person has a friend, family member, or acquaintance who is being verbally, emotionally, or sexually harassed via technology.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #4: Educate your peers. When engaging online with your male peers, friends and co-workers, look for opportunities to steer the conversation towards discussing why cyber VAW is not acceptable. These opportunities can include talking to them when you see them exhibit disrespectful or bullying behaviour towards women and girls in the online community; or when discussing high profile cases of male celebrities committing VAW. You can also invite your male peers to join you on liking anti-VAW Facebook pages, following anti-VAW Twitter accounts and participating in online discussions about the importance of stopping VAW.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #5: Lead by example. Make sure that your website, blog, social media profiles, and behaviour in forums, comments sections and chatrooms are free from any form of misogynistic behaviour including mansplaining, dismissing women’s opinions, sharing tasteless VAW jokes that blame the victim, sexist name-calling, putting up pictures extolling the ‘virtues’ of the rape and battery of women etc. Be self-aware about your own behaviour and treat women and girls as equals when engaging in online discussions or interactions with them. Step up to intervene when you see cyber VAW happening.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #6: Make Amends When You Make a Mistake. As an ally, you will make mistakes. Anything new that is being internalised has a learning curve, and learning to question societal norms certainly is no exception. Being an ally involves constantly learning and re-learning, constantly questioning your own attitudes and language. If you find that a view you hold or a post that you have shared is problematic, apologise. If you are called out on problematic behaviour, listen. Do not become defensive or feel as if you are being attacked when called out – it is the only way that you can learn and change.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #7: Call ’em out! People who perpetuate cyber VAW need to be called out on their behaviour IMMEDIATELY because many aggressors and trolls are empowered by the silence of bystanders and the protection of online anonymity. Make sure that they know that what they are doing is wrong. Even if you are the only voice saying so, your intervention may get them to reconsider their behaviour. Even if the the perpetrator declares that he means no harm, it is important to disrupt incidences of cyber VAW while it is happening by.publicly and calmly pointing out that cyber VAW has hurtful consequences for the victim, and reflects badly on the perpetrator.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #8: Be Specific. When you engage cyber VAW perpetrator about their behaviour, be specific about the exact behaviour that you are addressing, be it name-calling, victim-blaming, death threats, or rape threats. Having to defend their specific behaviour and tactic may cause some attackers to rethink what they are saying to try and having to think through their actions could trigger a change in their attitudes towards women online. Ask them questions you would like them to ask themselves: Would you issue this threat if it was a man expressing the same opinion?

Safety in NumbersMen Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #9: Safety in numbers. When attempting to call out the behaviour of a group of cyber VAW perpetrators or any other type of cyber bullies, form a group yourself. Talk privately to other members of the forum, page or community about what is happening and get their support to back each other up when facing down aggressive and misogynistic groups. Similarly, when you see someone courageously taking a cyber VAW perpetrator to task, chime in. This action has 3 effects: it lets the person know that someone else agrees with them; it signals to the victim that the community will not stand for the treatment she is receiving; and it lets the perpetrator(s) know that more than one person is calling out their behaviour.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #10: Use that button! Most social media sites have policies against bullying and hate language by allowing for comments, threads, and users to be flagged as offensive. If engaging the cyber VAW perpetrator is impossible either because he repeats his behaviour or you are facing an entire community that actively commits cyber VAW, use the reporting tools that most social media networks set up to enable communities to report hate language and bullying to get the perpetrator removed for repeat offenses.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #11: Reach Out. If you witness cyber VAW, remember to reach out to the target of the attack after you have intervened to stop the perpetrator. Provide support and engage with her to develop the best course of action. Find out how she wants to handle the situation and how she would like you to help. Online communities can easily make someone feel isolated when they are being attacked, so your outreach will help her to realise that there are people in the community who will not stand for cyber VAW and sexism and who are willing to step in to help.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #12: Take it offline. If reporting cyber VAW to social media network administrators, forum moderators or website owners do not yield any action and the cyber VAW continues to escalate, begin documenting the violence with screencaps and contact an agency, nonprofit or grassroots campaign specialising in stopping cyber VAW and cyber bullying with the evidence. They will be able to assist you or advice you regarding the next steps with taking action to hold the perpetrators or the site accountable for their actions. In certain cases of cyber VAW that can be localised to a country or city, report the case to the relevant authorities such as the police. With governments and law enforcement agencies in many countries such as Canada, the UK and The Philippines starting to recognise cyber VAW as a crime, there are now increasing avenues to getting help to stop cyber VAW.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #13: Create safe spaces. Whether you are a blogger, website owner, forum moderator, Facebook page administrator or are responsible for any online community, make sure you work with your fellow moderators/administrators to have a zero tolerance approach to cyber VAW and cyber bullying of any form. Make sure you are upfront with your policy on acceptable behaviour. Many major websites do this by stating on top of their comments sections or “about” sections of their websites and profile pages that while everyone is welcome, they will not tolerate bigoted, sexist, violent or disrespectful behaviour of any sort and they enforce it by moderating comments and banning those who violate their rules.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #14: Size does not matter.  If an organisation, celebrity or company makes misogynistic, violent, and hateful remarks towards women and girls online, or refuses to moderate cyber VAW on their show, website and social media channels, organise or join a campaign that hits them where it hurts – their profits. This approach has been done successfully several times. The latest example is that of the #FacebookRape campaign organised by Laura Bates (founder of The Everyday Sexism Project), Jaclyn Friedman (Women, Action, and the Media) and Soraya Chemaly a prominent feminist writer. In summer 2013, they and over 100 anti-Violence Against Women organisations (including The Pixel Project) mounted the #FBrape campaign to get companies to withdraw advertising from Facebook until Facebook agreed to take cyber VAW on their social network seriously.

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #15: Share Your Knowledge.  One of the greatest features of the internet and social media is its ability to spread information at a rapid pace. As an ally, you have the opportunity to spread the knowledge that you gain to people who are not necessarily looking for the same information. Make your awareness viral! When you find a good article or video that puts online violence in perspective, tweet it, blog about it, share it!

Men Helping Stop Cyber VAW – Tip #16: Be a virtual volunteer. Online anti-VAW nonprofits and organisations, such as The Pixel Project, are always looking for more people to get involved in the movement to end VAW. Whether you decide to volunteer with an online support service for survivors of VAW, or with a non-profit that specifically fights cyber VAW and cyber bullying, adding your voice to their ranks and allows for more information to be published faster, reaching more people. If for no other reason, your experiences and your insights are unique and valuable.

The Pixel Project Selection 2013 – 16 Notable Facebook Pages by Anti-Violence Against Women Organisations

Foto-FacebookFacebook quickly became one of the most used social networking sites.  It has grown from a gossip site to include cause- focused advocacy and global issues as part of its information sharing. Participants have shared, weighed in, debated, and joined virtual hands around the world to address a multitude of difficult human rights issues such as violence against women.  On Facebook, everyone becomes an activist and adds their voice to keep the subject – be it public rapes, female genital mutilation, or domestic violence – at the forefront of people’s minds with a simple click and share.

News stories, events, and opinions now go viral on sites like Facebook before they reach television.  Social networking has replaced the TV news show as a means to spread information happening not only in our communities, but around the world, linking what seemed like disparate and isolated acts of violence into a human rights issue that happens in every society and effects everyone.  On Facebook, hundreds of thousands of people share their opinion and demand action.  The power of Facebook seems to be limitless as one share equals 12 shares, which turns into 24, then 48, until over 100 people have seen and shared a piece of information, news link, or picture.

In this article, we highlight 16 anti-violence against women Facebook pages that are unique in their message and their delivery. This is our second annual list of recommended Facebook pages and we have selected them because they make an effort to temper humour with information, offer a significant way for their readers to help, and make those in the fight feel more powerful and part of something greater. They present a unique perspective on a global issue. So pick and choose a couple to ‘like’, or better yet – ‘like’ them all and get informed and take action.

Introduction by Michelle Cahill with updates by Regina Yau; 2013 list research and compiled by Jennifer Gallienne; Curated and Edited by Regina Yau and Carol Olson.

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Recommended Facebook Page #1: Abuse No More – Global

abusenormoreAbuse No More is a public page of a network of closed Facebook groups designed to offer private and safe spaces for survivors to talk, share, and get support from one another. As part of their mission to help survivors of domestic violence heal and rebuild their lives, their public page offers a variety of positive quotes that help keep spirits buoyant. Like this page if you feel in need of a lift and domestic violence survivors who need a safe space to talk can directly request for admission to the closed support groups.

Recommended Facebook Page #2: Blank Noise – India

240_17216359533_6924_n (1)Blank Noise is led and run completely by volunteers. A core team of volunteers from across geographical locations and age groups work with the collective. Blank Noise seeks to trigger public dialogue on the issue of street sexual harassment. Fifty percent of Blank Noise members are male and are referred to as Blank Noise Guys. Blank Noise works towards an attitudinal shift towards ‘eve-teasing’ and involves the public to take collective responsibility of the issue. Their Facebook page is one of the best ones out there for those who wish to keep up with news about women’s rights and violence against women in India.

Recommended Facebook Page #3: Catalyst Foundation – Vietnam

34113_131455520216469_3151165_nCatalyst Foundation helps build communities in Vietnam to fight human trafficking. There is no simple option to stop trafficking. Catalyst Foundation believes there is only a holistic approach to ending this tragedy. Through education and community development, Catalyst works to give these communities and its daughters hope. Their Facebook page is a reflection of this and anyone interested in how the fight to stop human trafficking in Vietnam should follow them to get the latest news about their campaigns as well as more general news about the issue from a Vietnam perspective.

Recommended Facebook Page #4: Draw the line campaign – Canada

528705_434454069915980_1327101798_n‘Draw The Line’ is an interactive campaign that aims to engage Ontarians in a dialogue about sexual violence. The campaign challenges common myths about sexual violence and equips bystanders with information on how to intervene safely and effectively. It is ‘Draw the Line’s hope to educate about how to spot sexual violence and empower users to make a difference. The news mix on their Facebook page a slanted towards reporting on and educating young people in their teens and twenties about the subject of consent and why learning to recognise whether consent is given is one of the keys to stopping sexual assault and rape.

Recommended Facebook Page #5: Free The Slaves – global

1467463_662949593726741_1795916166_nFree the Slaves liberate slaves around the world and help survivors of slavery rebuild their lives. They research real world solutions to eradicate slavery forever, and fight the systems that allow slavery to exist in the first place. This organisation uses world class research and compelling stories from the front lines of slavery to convince the powerful and the powerless that we can end slavery. For those who are particularly interested in the issue of slavery, their page offers a great introduction to the cause for first-timers as they share a good mix of articles that put slavery into its historical context as well as human interest stories focused on activists and survivors.

Recommended Facebook Page #6: Global Network of Women Peacebuilders – Global

13293_119001241462231_4267292_nThe Global Network of Women Peacebuilders, a program partner of the International Civil society Action network (ICAN), is a coalition of women’s groups and other civil society organisations from Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe, and Latin America that are directly involved in advocacy and action for the full implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1325 and 1820 (1888, 1889) on Women, Peace and Security at the local, national, regional, and international levels. They work to bridge the “gap between policy discussions and implementation and action on the ground on women, peace and security issues.” Their Facebook page swings between sharing news of the major activities and campaigns undertaken by their partners and members, and key Violence Against Women news in countries like Egypt and Afghanistan where women suffer some of the highest levels of gender-based violence in the world.

Recommended Facebook Page #7: Gotstared.at – Global

521820_625939720753972_1305007175_nGS.A is a counter-culture movement that raises awareness on social issues of violence, gender, and discrimination, and believes in the power of the internet to reach out. What began as an outlet to vent frustrations has now taken shape as an extensive movement through social networks online. Their Facebook page shares a wide range of anti-Violence Against Women news as well as a mix of feminist memes as well as videos that provoke discussion and thought not just about violence against women but gender inequality as a whole.

Recommended Facebook Page #8: Haitianwomennetwork.org – Haiti

haitianwomenHaitian Women Network is an advocacy group whose sole purpose is to campaign against abuse of young girls and women in Haiti, as well as to promote equality and dignity. On their Facebook page, they focus on sharing news about Haitian women’s rights, the progress in the rebuilding of Haiti after the earthquake, as well as news links about key violence against women issues and events from around the world.

Recommended Facebook Page #9 – New Light Kolkata – India

New LightNew Light is a non-profit community project based in Kalighat, Kolata, on of the oldest red light districts of the city.  Urmi Basu founded the organisation in 2000 to provide a variety of services and support for children, girls and women in the Kalighat community who are victims of trafficking, prostitution and other needs of women and girls. The New Light Facebook page provides updates about their work and campaigns, providing an insight about how working on the ground to help survivors of sex trafficking and forced prostitution is like in India.

Recommended Facebook Page #10: No More.org – USA

no moreNO MORE is a movement centered on a powerful new symbol that brings together all people who want to end domestic violence and sexual assault. Like the peace sign, the yellow “support our troops” ribbon, the red AIDS ribbon, or the pink breast cancer ribbon, the goal of the NO MORE symbol is to help spark a national dialogue and move the issues of domestic violence and sexual assault higher on the public’s agenda. Their Facebook page features coverage on high profile celebrities supporting their cause through PSAs, quotes and speaking out publicly about domestic violence.

Recommended Facebook Page #11: Project Unbreakable – Global

418277_376923302326591_2098750611_nThe mission of Project Unbreakable is to increase awareness of the issues surrounding sexual assault and encourage the act of healing through art. Since the project’s conception in October 2011, it has featured over two thousand images of sexual assault survivors holding posters with quotes from their attackers. Project Unbreakable has been featured media outlets such as Glamour, TIME, The Huffington Post, and The Guardian. Unbreakable’s Facebook and Tumblr pages have thousands of photos from users of all races and ages and genders.

Recommended Facebook Page #12: Safe Dehli Campaign – India

39178_136190593088227_3163083_nThe Safe Delhi Campaign aims to mobilise people in the city to act and make a change. This campaign believes that women and girls have a right to live a life free from violence and fear, and that all of us have a role to play in making this a reality. This campaign focuses on strategies to create safer environments for women and girls, and ways of getting different groups of people in the city involved. On their Facebook page, they share news links, videos and informational graphics about safety apps for women and girls, urban planning for the safety of women and girls, as well as selected news about efforts by major anti-VAW organisations such as UN Women.

Recommended Facebook Page #13: The Invisible War – US 

TheInvisibleWarFBProfilePicThe Invisible War, directed and produced by Oscar and Emmy-nominated Kirby Dick and Emmy-nominated Amy Ziering, is a searing expose of the epidemic of rape of soldiers within the US military, the institutions that perpetuate and cover up its existence, and its profound personal and social consequences. Their Facebook page provides up-to-date information about media coverage and statistics of sexual assault in the military.

Recommended Facebook Page #14: The Pixel Project – Global

PixelProjectFacebookThe Pixel Project is a global, totally volunteer-based initiative with volunteers spread across the world. Their goal is to stimulate the fight against gender violence through volunteering, men’s involvement and fundraising. Its completely virtual platform encourages one to step outside the box and see what is happening all over the world, all while encouraging participation in what is happening at home. The Pixel Project’s Facebook page shares information from all over the globe, encourages thoughtful discussion and keeps their followers up to date on what’s happening in the fight against gender violence.

Recommended Facebook Page #15: UltraViolet – USA

66846_462267770509938_2074753454_nUltraViolet is a new and rapidly growing community of women and men across the U.S. mobilised to fight sexism and expand women’s rights, from politics and government to media and pop culture. UltraViolet works on a range of issues, including health care, economic security, violence, and reproductive rights. Their Facebook page, though U.S.-centric, reflects their mission very well as they share news and information about a wide range of issues including domestic violence against women and sexism in politics and the workplace.

Recommended Facebook Page #16: White Ribbon Campaign – Pakistan

557494_364314376940563_687138729_nThe concept of men working to end violence against women is not only novel in Pakistan, but internationally as well. It is challenging, keeping in view the social and religious context of the culture. The aim behind WRCP is to instill in men that masculinity does not lie in using power against women. Rather, it lies in channeling this power for building a better future for the society. Their Facebook page is focused on sharing news of their campaigns and projects in Pakistan, and they try to keep things upbeat with a smattering of positive quote pictures popping up fairly regularly.

16 Notable Facebook Pages by Anti-Violence Against Women Organisations

Every morning, no matter where we are in the world, most of us begin our days on Facebook. In between pictures of cats and babies we read the latest updates on what our friends and families are doing… and post our own updates too.

The power of the one-click Facebook update is also felt with major news stories and opinions: Before a news story reaches the television airwaves, it is often already going viral on Facebook with hundreds of people sharing their opinion on it. The power of Facebook seems to be limitless as one share equals 12 shares, which turns into 24, then that equals 48, and the next thing you know 100 people have seen and shared a piece of information, news link or picture.

Thanks to social media networks such as Facebook, the power for change in the world today is more in reach than previously imaginable. For difficult human rights issues such as violence against women, Facebook helps organisations and activists keep the subject – be it acid attacks, female genital mutilation or domestic violence – at the forefront of people’s minds. Continue reading

Activism 101: 16 Striking Campaigns for the Cause to End Violence Against Women

As we have noted and discussed time and time again, Violence Against Women (VAW) is an issue that is considered controversial, taboo and/or normal in many communities and cultures worldwide to the point where, depending on the community and culture, any of the following take place:

  • VAW is swept under the rug – characterised as a “private” family matter that should never be discussed in public.
  • VAW becomes the “elephant in the room” in public discourse whereby communities know who is doing the beating/who are the rapists/who is being cut etc but willfully turn a blind eye.
  • VAW is seen as too “triggering” or ugly a topic to be discussed in normal conversation even while the media and entertainment normalises and desensitises VAW.
  • VAW is ridiculed as a special interest issue – a “women’s issue” – even if women comprise half the planet’s population and are certainly not a minority/special interest group.
  • VAW is demonised as a feminist and sexist red herring by Male Rights Activists and other upholders of the patriarchal norm.